David Moursund Books

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"If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing." (Benjamin Franklin; American scientist, inventor statesman, printer, philosopher; 1706-1790.)

Introduction

David Moursund is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of each of the 72 books listed on this IAE-pedia page. Currently 48 of these are listed in the next section and are available free on the Web. The other 24 are listed at the end of this Web page.

List and Links for Free IAE Books

The citation for each book in this section includes information about where it can be accessed on the Web. The number is front of the citation is the item number (reverse chronicle order) of the publication.

(48) Moursund, David (2/19/2016). Math Methods for Preservice Teachers. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
PDF file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/283-math-methods-for-preservice-elementary-teacher-1/file.html. Microsoft Word file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/282-math-methods-for-preservice-elementary-teacher/file.html. HTML file: http://iae-pedia.org/Math_Methods_for_Preservice_Elementary_Teachers.

The main audience for this short book is faculty who teach a Math Methods course for preservice elementary education teachers. I believe that most faculty who teach the Mathematics for Elementary Teachers course (most often taught in math departments) will also benefit from the book.

I have a third audience in mind. Please consider sharing this book with students taking a Math Methods course or a Math for Elementary Teachers course.

The book gives particular emphasis to three topics:

  1. Prerequisites for students and preparation of their faculty.
  2. Learning and teaching problem solving, both in math and also “across the curriculum”
  3. Integration of Computer and Information Science into teaching, learning, doing, and using math.


(47) Moursund, David (1/21/2016). Learning Problem-solving Strategies through the Use of Games: A Guide for Teachers and Parents. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
PDF file:http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/278-learning-problem-solving-strategies-through-the-use-of-games-a-guide-for-teachers-and-parents/file.html. Microsoft Word file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/280-pbl-book-first-edition/file.html.

This book is about project-based learning (PBL) in an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) environment. It is designed for teachers who want to implement PBL using ICT in their classrooms. Teachers who do this will gain increased understanding of ICT alongside their students.

PBL has long been an effective teaching tool for many teachers. PBL is now enhanced by routine use of ICT, so becomes a vehicle for learning “traditional” subject matter content and for learning how to use ICT effectively. The overarching goal of this book is to help students learn to use their minds (higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills) and ICT effectively as they plan and carry out complex projects.


(46) Moursund, David, & Sylwester, Robert, eds. (10/9/2015). Validity and Credibility of Information. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download a free Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/275-validity-and-credibility-of-information/file.html. Download a free PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/277-validity-and-credibility-of-information-2/file.html.

This 87-page book is for teachers, parents, and others interested in improving K-12 education. It is based on 17 recent IAE Newsletters. The overarching message is that students need to learn to identify, access, understand, and use information that is both valid and credible.

Validity describes concepts, conclusions, and/or measurements that are logically and factually sound. They are based on good reasoning, careful research, accurate information, and informed judgment. A research instrument or test is considered to be valid if it adequately measures what it purports to measure.

Credible is an adjective meaning believable, plausible, tenable, likely, probable, reasonable, and so on. We talk about the credibility of a person in terms of the credibility of the person’s allegations and claims. A person who routinely makes invalid allegations and claims is considered to not be credible. A number of websites do fact checking (often focusing on what politicians are saying and/or on common myths) and we can make use of these sites as an aid to determining the credibility of a person.


(45) Moursund, David (August, 2015). Brain Science for Educators and Parents. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Available on the Web at http://iae-pedia.org/Brain_Science. Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/271-brain-science-for-educators-and-parents-1/file.html and the Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/270-brain-science-for-educators-and-parents/file.html.

This introduction to brain science is specifically designed for preservice and inservice K-12 teachers, for teachers of these teachers, and for parents. Here are two important and unifying questions addressed throughout the book:

  1. What should preservice K-12 teachers, inservice K-12 teachers, and parents know about brain science?
  2. How should K-12 teachers be using their knowledge of brain science, both to improve their teaching and also to help their students gain grade level and subject area appropriate knowledge of brain science?

The goal of this 10-chapter book is to help you develop and understand answers that fit your needs as an educator and/or parent. Each chapter is relatively self-contained, and ends with a section on References and Resources related to that chapter. While most of the items in References and Resources are specifically cited within the chapter, occasionally one will fall into the category of “additional suggested resources.” Most entries are followed by a brief statement designed to help the reader link the reference content to the chapter content. The book ends with a final section on Videos for Brain Science for Educators and Parents. This lists all of the videos referenced in the book, organized by the chapter in which they appeared.


(44) Moursund, David, & Sylwester, Robert (April, 2015). Education for Students' Futures. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF File from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/269-education-for-students-futures-1.html. Download the Microsoft Word File from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/268-education-for-students-futures.html.

The intended audience for this 116-page book is preservice and inservice K-12 teachers, teachers of teachers, parents of school-age children, and others interested in our educational system. The book has multiple authors, although Moursund and Sylwester together have written more than half of the chapters.

The book's 22 chapters are arranged into four sections that describe major societal changes from the Industrial Revolution to the expected Technological Singularity (a possible time in the future when computers will be smarter than humans).


(43) Moursund, David (2/28/2015). Technology and Problem Solving in PreK-12 Education for Adult Life, Careers, and Further Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Available on the Web at http://iae-pedia. Microsoft Word file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/266-technology-and-problem-solving-in-prek-12-education.html. PDF file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/267-technology-and-problem-solving-in-prek-12-education-1.html.

This short book was specifically written for preservice and inservice PreK-12 teachers in all subject areas, and for their teachers. It uses problem solving as a unifying theme as it examines roles of computer technology in the content, pedagogy, and assessment aspects of schooling. The book addresses the problem of providing today’s students with a modern, future-looking education that prepares them for our rapidly changing world. We want students to be prepared for responsible adulthood, careers, further education, and a lifetime challenge of increasingly rapid technological change. Word document.


(42) Sylwester, Robert, & Moursund, David, eds. (March, 2014). Understanding and Mastering Complexity. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/256-understanding-and-mastering-complexity.html. Download the Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/255-understanding-and-mastering-complexity.html.

This book is designed for people interested in exploring ways that informal and formal education can help all of us to deal more easily with the complexity of many of our problems and tasks.

Progress in research and development helps to simplify some complex problems, and also can add to the complexity of others. For example, our authors consider the rapidly growing understanding of the human brain. They explore some of the ways in which the education profession has had to shift its perspective from a lack of understanding of functional brain organization to one in which such understanding can help to provide a foundation for improving our educational systems.

Or, consider Information and Communication Technology (ICT), a major change agent. Children who grow up making routine use of ICT do not view this “complexity” in the same manner as do adults who find some aspects of this rapidly changing technology to be such a challenge. These are only two of the complexities we are working to understand and master.


(41) Moursund, David (October, 2013). Math Maturity Distance Education Course. Eugene,OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/254-math-maturity-distance-education-course-1/file.html. Download the Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/253-math-maturity-distance-education-course/file.html.

This is a detailed syllabus for a 10-week (three quarter hours or two semester hours) graduate course developed by David Moursund. The course was offered through the University of Oregon Continuation Center as a distance education course Spring term, 2010.

The course is designed for inservice elementary school teachers with an interest in improving their knowledge and skills in teaching math. The materials are suitable for self-instruction.


(40) Sylwester, Robert, & Moursund, David, eds. (2013). Consciousness and Morality: Recent Research Developments. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the Microsoft Word file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/250-consciousness-and-morality-recent-research-developments.html and the PDF file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/251-consciousness-and-morality-recent-research-developments.html.

Morality is a human issue because we're a social species. Researchers thus wonder if morality emerged when social mammals discovered the values of cooperative behavior, or sometime after humans arrived. Two widely held historic beliefs are that moral behavior: 1) Is inspired by deities, and/or 2) Requires the rational level of mind that only humans have.

Chapters 1-4 synthesize recent biological consciousness research and chapters 5-6 biological morality research. Chapter 7 presents the alternate historical philosophical and theological perspective of consciousness and morality. The scholars whose work is synthesized don't necessarily agree with each other, but that's all right. Collegial disagreements tend to move a field forward.


(39) Moursund, David, & Sylwester, Robert, eds. (2013). Common Core State Standards for K-12 Education in America. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Available on the Web at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/249-common-core-state-standards-for-k-12-education-in-america.html for the Microsoft Word document and http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/248-common-core-state-standards-for-k-12-education-in-america.html for the PDF.

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) initiative began in the United States in 2010. Its initial emphasis on Math and English Language Arts has grown to include Science and History/Social Studies. The CCSS will likely become a significant area of national curricular and testing concern in the years ahead.

Recently, Information Age Education has published a series of 11 IAE Newsletters on CCSS. These 11 newsletters have been integrated into a 75-page book, Common Core State Standards for K-12 Education in America. The set of newsletters has been augmented by an Appendix, Goals of Education in the United States.

This book is an experiment in a new way to put together an edited collection of writings. Chapter 11 of the book contains a brief introduction to a number of topics that are suitable for making into additional chapters. Potential authors should contact David Moursund (moursund@uorgon.edu) about submitting a chapter based on Chapter 11 ideas or other ideas of their own choice. The book will “grow” as new chapters are integrated into it.


(38) Moursund, David (2012). Good Math Lesson Planning and Implementation. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/230-good-math-lesson-plans.html and the Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/229-good-math-lesson-plans.html.

This short book is designed to help preservice and inservice teachers of math become better math teachers. Both elementary school and secondary school teachers of math should find the content useful.

The book draws heavily on the IAE-pedia document, Good Math Lesson Plans, available at http://iae-pedia.org/Good_Math_Lesson_Plans. That page is consistently one of the most popular of the content pages in the IAE-pedia.


(37) Sylwester, Robert, & Moursund, David, eds. (2012). Creating an Appropriate 21st Century Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/243-creating-an-appropriate-21st-century-education.html and the Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/242-creating-an-appropriate-21st-century-education.html.

This free 103-page book contains a series of 20 IAE Newsletters that explore various elements of the educational issues that will confront our society during the 21st century. The principal focus of the series is on the dramatic developments currently occurring in the cognitive neurosciences and computer technology. These promise to play an especially significant role in reshaping educational policy and practice.

The authors of the articles are all widely known and respected for their work in the areas in which they write. They were asked to select a general issue that they consider important to 21st century education and to discuss the elements that they consider especially significant to educators. Some authors focus on simply exploring the issue itself and others also suggest educational applications.


(36) Moursund, David (2012). Improving Elementary School Math Education: Some Roles of Brain/Mind Science and Computers. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access the PDF file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/232-improving-elementary-school-math-education-some-roles-of-brainmind-science-and-computers.html. Access the Microsoft Word file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/231-improving-elementary-school-math-education-some-roles-of-brainmind-science-and-computers.html.

This book is designed for use in the preservice and inservice education of elementary school teachers whose duties include teaching math. The book provides an introduction to brain science and mind topics important to math teaching and learning. The goal of the book is to improve the quality of math education that elementary school students are receiving. In this 2012 reprinting of the original 2004 book, a few errors have been corrected, the Index has been expanded, a small set of more recent references has been added, and the final chapter has been reconstructed from notes written in 2004.


(35) Moursund, David (2012). Using Brain/Mind Science and Computers to Improve Elementary School Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/239-using-brainmind-science-and-computers-to-improve-elementary-school-math-education.html. Download the Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/239-using-brainmind-science-and-computers-to-improve-elementary-school-math-education.html.

This book is specifically designed for use in the preservice and inservice education of elementary school teachers whose duties include teaching math. It provides an introduction to brain/mind science and computers as they relate to teaching and learning math. The goal of the book is to improve the quality of math education that elementary school students are receiving.

The book contains a large number of links to materials currently available on the Web and an extensive index.


(34) Moursund, David, & Albrecht, Robert (2011). Becoming a Better Math Tutor. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/208-becoming-a-better-math-tutor.html. Download the Microsoft word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/209-becoming-a-better-math-tutor.html.

This book is designed to help math tutors and their tutees to become better at their respective and mutual tasks. The intended audiences for this book include volunteer and paid tutors, preservice and inservice teachers, parents and other child caregivers, students who help other students (peer tutors), and developers of tutorial software and other materials.


(33) Moursund, David, & Albrecht, Robert (2011). Using Math Games and Word Problems to Increase Math Maturity. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the PDF file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/211-using-math-games-and-word-problems-to-increase-the-math-maturity-of-k-8-students.html. Download the Microsoft Word file from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/210-using-math-games-and-word-problems-to-increase-the-math-maturity-of-k-8-students.html.

This book was created for preservice and inservice teachers with the goal of improving the informal and formal math education of preK-8 students. The authors emphasize using simple, inexpensive games to provide students with learning environments that help to increase their levels of math maturity. The focus is on learning for understanding that will last a lifetime.

The book includes both underlying math education “theory” and a variety of games. There is considerable emphasis on developing and testing strategies to help increase one’s effectiveness in dealing with recurring math-related problems and problem situations.


(32) Moursund, David (2011). Play Together, Learn Together: STEM. (The first edition of the book was titled Expanding the Science and Technology Learning Experiences of Children). Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Download the Microsoft Word document from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/213-play-together-learn-together-stem.html.Download the PDF document from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/212-play-together-learn-together-stem.html. Download the first edition from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/207-expanding-the-science-and-technology-learning-experiences-of-children.html.

The book is for all adults who are interested in working with children to help improve their science and technology education. It contains a large number of examples and links to other materials. Some can be used independently by children, and some are best used with a child and adult working together. It is especially aimed at three audiences:

  • Parents who take their children to a Science and Technology Museum and/or who want to recreate part of such an experience with their children at home. Parents doing home schooling fall into this category.
  • Teachers who take their students to a Science and Technology Museum and/or who want to make use of the Web as a "virtual Science and Technology Museum" for their students.
  • Preservice teachers who want to learn about Web-based Science and Technology resources that will be useful to them when they do field placements in schools and later become teachers.


(31) Moursund, David (2010). Syllabus: Increasing the Math Maturity of K-8 Students and Their Teachers. A course developed by David Moursund. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Retrieved 12/16/2011 from http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/201-extended-syllabusfor-prism-course.html.

This course is specifically designed for inservice teachers of math and science. The focus is on increasing K-8 student levels of math maturity, with an emphasis on computational thinking and problem solving across the curriculum. Course participants must have email and Web access as well as access to elementary or middle school students in order to carry out a number of the course assignments.

Time and Quality Requirements: The total expectation is 120 hours of effort. The course syllabus is based on dividing the 120 hours of the course into 10 Units (Lessons) of about 12 hours each. This is a graduate course. The expectations and standards will be similar to those in other graduate-level courses in high quality colleges and universities. Participants are expected to have the maturity and interest to take personal responsibility for their own learning and to do high quality work in the assignments.


(30) Moursund, David (2009). Becoming More Responsible for Your Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/39-becoming-more-responsbile-for-your-education.html.

This 96-page book has an 8th grade reading level and is written specifically for young teenagers. Its goal is to help these students learn to take more responsibility for their own education. By age 13, many students are beginning to have the mental maturity to take such a major role. Preservice teachers, inservice teachers, and parents will also find the book useful. For example, parents may want to read the book along with their young teen-age children, and use the reading to facilitate “serious” educational conversations with their children.


(29) Moursund, David (2008, 2009). Introduction to Using Games in Education: A Guide for Teachers and Parents. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access PDF file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/19-introduction-to-using-games-in-education-a-guide-for-teachers-and-parents.html. Access Microsoft Word file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/20-introduction-to-using-games-in-education-a-guide-for-teachers-and-parents.html.

This book is written for people who are interested in helping children learn through games and to learn about games. The intended audience includes teachers, parents and grandparents, and all others who want to learn more about how games can be used effectively in education. Special emphasis is given to roles of games in a formal school setting.

Education has many goals, and there is a huge amount of research and practitioner knowledge about teaching and learning. This book is well-rooted in this research and practitioner knowledge. Five of the important ideas that are stressed include:

  • Learning to learn.
  • Learning about one’s strengths and weaknesses as a learner.
  • Becoming better at solving challenging problems and accomplishing challenging tasks.
  • Transfer of learning from game-playing environments to other environments.
  • Intrinsic motivation—students being engaged because they want to be engaged.


(28) Moursund, David (2007, 2010). Introduction to Problem Solving in the Information Age. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access PDF file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/7-introduction-to-problem-solving-in-the-information-age.html. Access Microsoft Word file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/8-introduction-to-problem-solving-in-the-information-age.html.

This short 99-page book is intended primarily for preservice and inservice teachers of K-12 students, and the teachers of these teachers. In this book, the term problem solving includes posing and solving problems, posing and accomplishing tasks, posing and answering questions, and posing and making decisions.

Problem solving is an integral component of every academic discipline. Humans solve problems using their physical and mental capabilities, and tools that they have developed. The Information Age has brought us a wide range of computer-based tools that are powerful aids to problem solving. Now, more than ever, it is important to stress problem solving and higher-order critical thinking throughout our educational system.


(27) Moursund, David (2007). College Student's Guide to Computers in Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at PDF file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/1-college-students-guide-to-computers-in-education.html. Access Microsoft Word file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/2-college-students-guide-to-computers-in-education.html.

This short book is for undergraduate and graduate college and university students, and for others thinking about enrolling in higher education courses. The information and ideas presented will help college students to obtain an education that will be useful throughout their lives in our rapidly changing Information Age world.

Change is one of the themes of this book. We are living at a time of a rapid technological change. The rate of change is increasing. Such change brings with it both threats and opportunities. Students can shape their informal and formal education to diminish the threats and increase the opportunities.

Gaining a competitive advantage is one of the underlying themes of the book. Computer technology empowers and enables its users. This means that, in any academic area of study, a student can gain a competitive advantage by developing a higher level of “traditional” expertise in the area and also by developing an increased level of expertise in using computers in the area.


(26) Moursund, David (2007). Faculty Member’s Guide to Computers in Higher Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access PDF file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/15-faculty-members-guide-to-computers-in-higher-education.html. Access Microsoft Word file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/16-faculty-members-guide-to-computers-in-higher-education.html

The goal of this book is to help improve college and university education. The primary audience is faculty who teach college and university courses. This includes guest lecturers, graduate assistants, adjuncts, tenure-track faculty, tenured faculty, researchers who teach an occasional course, and others.

The primary focus is on Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Note that this is often called Information Technology (IT), but that term fails to capture the importance of the communication aspect of the computer technology field.

The secondary focus is on Computer and Information Science (CIS). CIS is a relatively new academic discipline, with its own collected body of knowledge and achievement. It also provides an important way of thinking, called computational thinking. This refers to human intelligence working together with computer capabilities (including artificial intelligence) to solve problems and accomplish tasks.


(25) Moursund, David (2007). Computational Thinking and Math Maturity: Improving Math Education in K-8 Schools. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/3-computational-thinking-and-math-maturity-improving-math-education-in-k-8-schools.html.

This book addresses the problem that our K-8 school math educational system is not as successful as many people would like it to be, and it is not as successful as it could be. It is designed as supplementary material for use in a Math Methods course for preservice K-8 teachers. However, it can also be used by inservice K-8 teachers and for students enrolled in Math for Elementary and Middle School teachers courses.

The book draws upon and explores four Big Ideas that, taken together, have the potential to significantly improve out math education. The Big Ideas are:

  1. Thinking of learning math as a process of both learning math content and a process of gaining in math maturity. Our current math educational system does a poor job of building math maturity.
  2. Thinking of a student’s math cognitive development in terms of the roles of both nature and nurture. Research in cognitive acceleration in mathematics and other disciplines indicates we can do much better in fostering math cognitive development.
  3. Understanding the power of computer systems and computational thinking as an aid to representing and solving math problems and as an aid to effectively using math in all other disciplines.
  4. Placing increased emphasis on learning to learn math, making effective use of use computer-based aids to learning, and information retrieval.


(24) Moursund, David (2007, 2009). Computers in Education for Talented and Gifted Students: A Book for Elementary and Middle School Teachers. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access Microsoft Word version at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/4-computational-thinking-and-math-maturity-improving-math-education-in-k-8-schools.html and PDF at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/3-computational-thinking-and-math-maturity-improving-math-education-in-k-8-schools.html http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/13-computers-in-education-for-talented-and-gifted-students.html.

This book explores various roles of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in talented and gifted (TAG) education. The three goals of this book are:

  • To help improve the educational opportunities and education of TAG students.
  • To increase the general knowledge of teachers about the field of computers in education.
  • To explore some possible changes designed to improve our educational system. Many of the ideas in this book are applicable to all students, not just to TAG students.

Most of the content of this book has been written specifically for preservice or inservice “regular education” elementary and middle school teachers. Other possible readers include parents, TAG teachers, TAG students, school administrators, and so on. The book assumes some familiarity with education in general, but does not assume specific previous knowledge about TAG education.


(23) Moursund, David (2006). Parents’ Guide to Computers in Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/21-parents-guide-to-computers-in-education.html.

While the main focus of this short book is on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) aspects of education, many other educational topics are covered briefly. Our school systems have been slow to integrate ICT into the everyday curriculum. Thus, the school-based education of many children is weak because it does not help students to take advantage of the capabilities of ICT as an aid to solving complex problems and accomplishing complex tasks. This situation presents a major opportunity to improve children’s informal and formal education.

The average child spends more hours per week playing and working with electronic media (video games, the Internet, television, music players, cell phones, and so on) than in school. Parents and other caregivers play a huge role in improving both the informal and formal education of their children. Working alone and in cooperation with teachers, a parent, a grandparent, or another caregiver can help children get a much better education than they will receive without such explicit help.


(22) Moursund, David (2005). Planning, Forecasting, and Inventing Your Computers-in-Education Future. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/23-planning-forecasting-and-inventing-your-computers-in-education-future.html.

I strongly believe that our educational system can be a lot better than it currently is. Indeed, I predict that during the next two decades we will substantially improve our educational system. In this book, I enlist the reader’s help in making this prediction come true.

The focus in this book is on two aspects of improving our educational system:

  1. Improving the quality of education that K-12 students are receiving.
  2. Improving the professional lives of teachers and other educators.

The book is mainly designed for preservice and inservice teachers and other educators. If you fall into this category, you will find that it focuses on your possible future with Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in education. It will do this by:

  • Helping you to make and implement some ICT-related decisions that will likely prove very important to you during your professional career in education.
  • Helping you to increase your productivity and effectiveness as you work to improve the quality of education being received by your students.


(21) Moursund, David (2005, 2006, 2010). Brief Introduction to Educational Implications of Artificial Intelligence. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/6-introduction-to-educational-implications-of-artificial-intelligence.html.

This book is designed to help preservice and inservice teachers learn about some of the educational implications of current uses of Artificial Intelligence as an aid to solving problems and accomplishing tasks.

Humans and their predecessors have developed a wide range of tools to help solve the types of problems that they face. Such tools embody some of the knowledge and skills of those who discover, invent, design, and build the tools. Because of this, in some sense a tool user gains in knowledge and skill by learning to make use of tools.

Tools empower and enable their users. AI provides mind tools, and AI also helps to automate tools that aid one’s physical body.


(20) Moursund, David (2005). Introduction to Information and Communication Technology in Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/17-introduction-to-information-and-communication-technology-in-education.html.

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is a major challenge to our educational system. This book is designed for use by PreK-12 preservice and inservice teachers, and by teachers of these teachers. It provides a brief overview of some of the key topics in the field of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in education.

The book has three major goals:

  1. To help you to increase your expertise as a teacher. There is substantial research that supports the contention that students get a better education when they have “better” teachers.
  2. To help you to increase your knowledge and understanding of various roles of ICT in curriculum content, instruction, and assessment. There is significant research to support the benefits of ICT in these three areas. In addition, ICT is now an important content area in each of the disciplines that you teach or are preparing to teach.
  3. To help you to increase your higher-order, critical thinking, problem-solving knowledge and skills. Special attention is paid to roles of ICT as an aid to solving complex problems and accomplishing complex tasks in all curriculum areas. Research suggests that U.S. schools are not nearly as strong as they could be in helping students gain increased expertise in problem solving and critical thinking skills.


(19) Moursund, David (2005). Improving Math Education in Elementary Schools: A Short Book for Teachers. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://pages.uoregon.edu/moursund/Books/ElMath/ElMath.pdf.

One of the big and unifying ideas in this book is procedures and procedural thinking. From the point of view of the elementary school math teachers, a major goal is to help students learn some math procedures and learn how to think in terms of using these procedures to solve problems. The same idea lies at the core of the field of computer and information science. However, there is a difference between how math people and computer people approach the big idea of procedure. They both think about two types of procedures:

  1. Algorithms. These are step-by-step procedures that can be proved to solve a certain type of problem or accomplish a certain type of task in a finite number of steps. You know algorithms for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of integers. You know many other algorithms, such as an algorithm for alphabetizing a list of words and an algorithm for looking up a word in a dictionary.
  2. Heuristics. These are step-by-step procedures that are designed to solve or help solve a certain type of problem or accomplish a certain type of task, but are not guaranteed to actually do so. As you work to solve a challenging math problem, you likely use heuristic procedures such as draw a picture, look up information in a book, ask a friend, attempt to break the problem into a set of smaller problems, and guess and check.


(18) Moursund, D.G. (1999, 2002). Project-based Learning in an Information Technology Environment. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education. In 2016, ISTE returned the copyright for this book to David Moursund. The first edition (1999) is now available free online. PDF file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/281-project-based-learning-using-information-technology/file.html. Microsoft Word file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/280-pbl-book-first-edition/file.html.

This book is about project-based learning (PBL) in an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) environment. The book is designed for teachers who want to implement PBL using ICT in their classrooms. Teachers who do this will gain increased understanding of ICT alongside their students.

PBL has long been a teaching tool of many teachers. PBL is enhanced by routine use of ICT, so it is now a vehicle for learning “traditional” subject matter content and for learning how to use ICT effectively. The overarching goal of this book is to help students learn to use their minds (higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills) and ICT effectively as they plan and carry out complex projects.


(17) Moursund, David (1997). The Future of Information Technology in Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/191-the-future-of-information-technology-in-education.html.

Here are some Information Age buzz words that are part of our everyday world: agent technology; cable modem; cellular telephone; CD-ROM; color laser printer; communications satellite; computer animation; computer-assisted instruction; computer-assisted learning; computer simulation; desktop conferencing; desktop publication; desktop presentation; digital camera; digital music; digital radio; digital television; direct-broadcast satellite; distance education; DVD-ROM; edutainment; fax; fiber optics; floppy disk; geographic information system; global positioning system; High Definition Television; information highway; laser printer; local area network; hypermedia; hypertext; Internet; Java; laser disc; mainframe computer; microcomputer; minicomputer; modem; multimedia; network; optical disk; personal digital assistant; software; super computer; video telephone; virtual reality; wide area network; and World Wide Web.

This 1997 book was originally published by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). Quoting from the Preface: "This book is about the future of information technology in K-12 education. It is intended for people who have an interest in how information technology will change and improve education. This includes parents, teachers, school administrators, school board members, legislators, corporate foundations, and educational policy makers."


(16) Moursund, David (1996, 2002). Increasing Your Expertise as a Problem Solver: Some Roles of Computers. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/192-increasing-your-expertise-as-a-problem-solver-some-roles-of-computer.html.

This book will help you to learn more about your mind and computers, and how they can work together to solve problems. The emphasis is on the types of problems that a computer can be a useful aid in solving.

The study of the human mind and human intelligence has a long history. In recent years, the field of cognitive science has developed and blossomed. A cognitive scientist may be: a computer scientist who is developing computer models of how the human mind works; a neural biologist who is working to understand how a collection of neurons can learn and can solve problems; a psychologist who is developing new learning theories; a linguist working to understand how the human mind processes language; and so on.


(15) Moursund, David; Bielefeldt, Talbot; Ricketts, Dick; & Underwood, Siobhan (1995). Effective practice: Computer Technology in Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/203-effective-practice-computer-technology-in-education.html.

This book is designed to help students, teachers, parents, and policymakers make more effective use of computer technology in education. It serves two main functions. First, it provides background information to help schools develop and refine technology plans. Second, it is meant to serve as a communication tool to help educators articulate the reality and potential of technology to parents, policymakers, resource providers, and other stakeholders in the education of our children.


(14) Moursund, David (1996, 2002). Proposal Writing for Technology in Education: Obtaining Resources to Improve Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access the 2002 revision of the book at http://pages.uoregon.edu/moursund/Books/GrantWriting/index.htm.

This book focuses on writing proposals to obtain resources for computer-related technology in education. The book is intended for educators, parents, and other people who are committed to improving our educational system through appropriate use of technology. Many of these people are not experienced in writing proposals. However, they are willing to commit their time and energies in an attempt to obtain resources needed to improve the education of our nation’s students.

Roughly speaking, our educational system can be divided into a formal and an informal component. Formal education includes the public and private schools at the K-12 level and higher education. Informal education includes activities done through science and technology museums, after-school programs, weekend programs, summer programs, church programs, and so on. The home and the community are essential components of our informal educational system. Both the formal and the informal components of education participate in writing grant proposals.


(13) Austin Tackett; Francisco Caracheo; Robin Davis; Octavio Henao; Beth Morgan; Dave Moursund; John Owens; Mark Standley (1993, 2004). The Technology Advisory Council: A Vehicle for Improving Education. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/190-the-technology-advisory-council-a-vehicle-for-improving-our-schools-.html.

This book was written as a team project by David Moursund and his students in a graduate seminar. Advisory Councils are a key part of site-based management. An Advisory Council should be broadly representative of the stakeholders—the people who are affected by the decisions that need to be made and the people who are involved in implementing those decisions. Thus, an Advisory Council for computer technology in schools might well include students, parents, teachers, school administrators, school board members, taxpayers, business people, local university faculty, union representatives, and elected officials.

The book can help a Technology Advisory Council to get started and later provide a sense of direction for some actions that the TAC might accomplish.


(12) Moursund, David, & Yoder, Sharon (1993). Problem Solving and Communication in a HyperCard Environment. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access the PDF file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/234-problem-solving-and-communication-in-a-hypercard-environment.html. Access the Microsoft Word file at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/233-problem-solving-and-communication-in-a-hypercard-environment.html.

This book provides an introduction to HyperCard, with the main focus being on communication and problem solving. It covers most of the main features of HyperCard and includes a very brief introduction to HyperTalk, the underlying programming language in the HyperCard system.

The HyperCard system is designed so that a beginner can easily get started and experience considerable success. However, the HyperCard system contains a huge range of capabilities. HyperCard is a very powerful tool. Most people find that it takes a great deal of time, effort, and experience to master this tool.

Communication: To create a HyperCard document—called a stack—you communicate with a computer system that is running the HyperCard software. You create this stack so that you yourself can use it (so that it communicates effectively with you) and/or so others can use it (so that it communicates effectively with others).

Problem Solving: The computer is a general-purpose aid to solving problems, much like books, calculators, reading, writing, and arithmetic are general aids to problem solving. As you learn HyperCard, you can simultaneously learn about problem solving in a HyperCard environment, problem solving in a computer environment, and problem solving in non computer environments. Thus, you can improve your overall problem-solving skills.


(11) Moursund, David (1990, 1993, 2004). Getting Smarter at Solving Problems. (An early version of the book was titled The Mind and the Computer: Problem Solving in the Information Age.) Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/28-the-mind-and-the-computer-problem-solving-in-the-information-age.html.

This book specifically is designed to be used as a supplemental text in a secondary school Computer Literacy course. When used in that format, the book contains sufficient materials to be used two days a week or part of each day in a semester-length course.

The book can also be used in a wide variety of other settings: in a "Modern Problems" class in the social studies; in a course on problem solving; in a math course. In all cases the emphasis is on problem solving in general, and on the roles of computers as an aid to problem solving.

This book is based on the following two premises, both strongly supported by the research literature:

  1. Through the appropriate study of the discipline of problem solving, a student can become better at solving both school problems and non-school problems.
  2. Computers are a powerful aid to problem solving. A student can become better at solving certain types of problems by learning to make appropriate use of computers as an aid to solving the problems.

In 2010, Sigurd Alnæs produced and published a Norwegian version of the book.

Moursund, David, & Alnæs, Sigurd (2010). Bli bedre til å løse problemer.

Most of the original content was preserved and Alnæs added quite a lot of new content. The Norwegian book is available free on the website http://ndla.no/nb/node/26090/menu751.


(10) Moursund, David (1990, 1993, 2004). Teachers’ Manual: Getting Smarter at Solving Problems. This book is also titled: Teacher’s Manual for the Mind and the Computer: Problem Solving in the Information Age. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/32-teachers-manual-for-the-mind-and-the-computer-problem-solving-in-the-information-age.html.

This book is designed to support the book above, Getting Smarter at Solving Problems. It has one chapter in the manual for each chapter in the book. Each chapter of the manual contains:

  1. A rationale and overview of the chapter in the text. This is a brief summary of the ideas and why they are included in the text.
  2. Ways to coordinate the Getting Smarter at Solving Problems materials with a variety of computer literacy courses.
  3. One or more lesson plans. These include black line masters (for overhead transparencies) and additional activities that can be used in class, as assignments, or in assessment activities.


(9) Moursund, David (1989). Effective Inservice for Integrating Computer-as-Tool into the Curriculum. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/25-effective-inservice-for-integrating-computer-as-tool-into-the-curriculum.html.

This book is designed to help three types of educational leaders:

  1. Educators who are currently learning to design and present inservice for integration of the computer as a tool into the curriculum. These will mainly be well-established and quite experienced teachers, frequently a school building level computer coordinator or a computer representative.
  2. Educators who are already inservice providers, but who might benefit from an overview of some of the underlying theory and ideas of effective inservice practices, as well as from access to inservice evaluation materials.
  3. Educators who are hiring, supervising, or evaluating inservice providers for computer integrated instruction.

In addition to specifically targeting the needs of the three types of leaders mentioned above, the book is firmly rooted in the research literature of effective inservice. The literature surveys and references it contains can be useful to graduate students and researchers in the field of effective inservice.


(8) Moursund, David (1988). Computers and Problem Solving: An Independent Study Course. Eugene, OR: International Council for Computers in Education.
Available free online as a PDF file at http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED302217.pdf.

See the companion book below for a description.


(7) Moursund, David (1986, 1988, 2004). Computers and Problem Solving: A Workshop for Educators. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/188-computers-and-problem-solving-a-workshop-for-educators.html.

This 58-page book includes many classroom activities both for use in staff development and for use in K-12 classroom teaching. Quoting from the Preface to the 2004 reprint:

In my opinion, Computers and Problem Solving: A Workshop for Educators is still a very useful book. The original text has been modified by the addition of a few commas and a change of the word “which” to “that” in a couple of places. The original illustrations (designed to lighten up the text) have not been included. Appendix B, which was written for use in a revision of the book that did not occur, has been added for historical purposes. I am pleased that this book can be made available (at no charge) to those who wish to access it through the Web.


(6) Moursund, David (1986, 1988, 1989, 2004). High Tech/High Touch: A Computer Education Leadership Development Workshop. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education. Microsoft Word file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/free-ebooks-by-dave-moursund/274-high-tech-high-touch-a-computer-education-leadership-development-workshop-1/file.html. PDF file: http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/189-high-techhigh-touch-a-computer-education-leadership-development-workshop.html.

Quoting from the Preface to the 2004 reprint:

I find it interesting to look at current aspects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in education from the point of view of high tech/high touch. The capabilities of ICT systems have grown by a factor of perhaps 10,000 or more since the Tofflers wrote The Third Wave. ICT has been a major change factor in our society and in the world. A gradual pattern of “tech” versus “touch” has emerged. ICT (the “tech”) has sped up and/or facilitated increased automation of many tasks and problem-solving activities. People often draw an analogy with how the machines of the industrial revolution changed the nature of physical work. The machines of the ICT revolution are changing the nature of mental work. In combination, the industrial revolution and the ICT revolution are significantly changing the nature of the work that people do. And, of course, they are changing the standard of living, formal and informal education, and many other aspects of our lives.


(5) Moursund, David (1985, 2005). Collected Editorials. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/182-editorials-1974-1985.html.

Contains a Moursund autobiography (up to 1985) and Moursund’s first 53 editorials published in The Computing Teacher. For a complete collection of all of Moursund's editorials published by ICCE and ISTE, see http://iae-pedia.org/David_Moursund_Editorials.


(4) Moursund, David (1985, 1992). The Technology Coordinator. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education. This is the 2nd edition of a book first published in 1985.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/187-the-technology-coordinator.html.

The first edition of this book was published in 1985 with the title, The Computer Coordinator. Since that time the number of computers in schools has grown immensely, the quality and capability of computer hardware and software has grown substantially, and the complexity of the computer coordinator's job at the school and at the school district level has continued to increase.

Moreover, the nature of the "computer coordinator" job has changed. The past seven years have seen a massive switch in computer use in schools from computer programming to computer applications (computer-as-tool) and to computer-assisted learning (CAL). The idea of a hypermedia classroom has emerged. (A hypermedia classroom provides students and teachers access to a wide range of electronic and non-electronic information technology facilities. The facilities may be used to create interactive, non-linear materials that are called hypermedia documents.) Computer networks have become common. Telecommunications—electronic mail, electronic bulletin boards, electronic conferencing, and use of online databases—has grown very rapidly.


(3) Moursund, David (1983). Precollege Computer Literacy: A Personal Computing Approach. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education. (This 27-page booklet is a “golden oldie.")
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/30-precollege-computer-literacy-a-personal-computing-approach.html.

It is generally agreed that all students should become computer literate, but no definition of computer literacy has gained widespread acceptance. This (golden oldie) short booklet defines computer literacy in a manner that can guide educators as they work to implement universal computer literacy through precollege education.

This booklet is intended for curriculum specialists, elementary and secondary school teachers, media specialists, teachers of teachers, and others concerned with curriculum in precollege education. It defines and discusses computer literacy for elementary and secondary school students. The approach is via an analysis of personal computing and the aspects of computers that can have a direct impact on students. Students can be personally involved with computers through computer assisted learning, computer assisted problem solving, the study of computer and information science and through the use of computers for entertainment. Students can learn how computers are affecting the world of business, government, and industry-and thus, how computers will be part of their future. Each of these aspects of personal computing contributes to the definition of a set of goals for computer literacy in elementary and secondary schools. The resulting overall goal is for a working knowledge of computers-that is, knowledge that facilitates the everyday use of computers by students. This knowledge lays a firm foundation for future learning about computers and for coping with the inevitable changes that will occur in this technology.


(2) Moursund, David (1980, 2005). Teacher's Guide to Computers in the Elementary School. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/186-teachers-guide-to-computers-in-the-elementary-school.html.

This was the second book published by ICCE. Quoting from the Preface to this 1980 book:

Most elementary school teachers are people-oriented, and are not particularly machine-oriented. They are vitally concerned with children, in helping children to develop their potentials and to learn. It is not surprising, then, that many elementary school teachers view computers and calculators with suspicion. Will computers help students to learn more, better, faster? Will use of calculators lead to a better understanding of mathematics and increased problem-solving skills? Will calculators and computers dehumanize education? The answers to these questions are both yes and no. Much depends upon the teacher, the student, the equipment, the instructional materials, and so on. The knowledge, attitude, and skills of the teacher are apt to be the dominant factors.
Ten years ago questions about instructional use of calculators and computers were of academic interest, but did not concern the ordinary elementary school teacher. Calculators and computers were too expensive, and were not even readily available in high schools. Their impact upon most elementary schools was zero. But the price of both calculators and computers has declined rapidly, so that now good quality calculators cost under $10, and computers are beginning to become a common household item. Calculator and computer usage is commonplace in many junior high schools and high schools. It is no longer appropriate for elementary school teachers and elementary schools to ignore their potential uses in instruction.


(1) Moursund, David (1980, 1983, 2005). School Administrator’s Introduction to Instructional Use of Computers. Eugene, OR: Information Age Education. This is a reprint of the 1983 edition of the first book published by ICCE.
Access at http://i-a-e.org/downloads/doc_download/185-school-administrators-introduction-to-instructional-use-of-computers.html.

The School Administrator’s book was the first book published by the International Council for Computers in Education (ICCE). The original book was published in 1980 and was 48 pages in length. The version reprinted here is the “Fourth Printing with Revisions, April 1983.” This revision is 64 pages in length. During those early years, ICCE made use of a press at the University of Oregon that printed 16 page “signatures.” That is, for the 5 1/2 inch by 8 1/2 inch page size we used for booklets, one could most easily have 16, 32, 48, or 64 pages of length. The April 1983 revision was an expansion from 48 pages to 64 pages. Part of the expansion was done by including seven editorials from The Computing Teacher. The seventh of these editorials appeared in the April 1983 issue of The Computing Teacher.

Books Not Available on the Web

The following books are not available free on the IAE website or on other Moursund websites. They are listed in order of publication date.

1. Moursund, D.G., & Duris, C. (1967). Elementary Theory and Application of Numerical Analysis. McGraw-Hill. Reprinted by Dover Publications in 1988. Apparently no longer available after 2003. A version of the book prepared by James E. Miller has the FORTRAN programs replaced by C++ programs and was published in 2012. The book can be purchased at http://store.doverpublications.com/0486479064.html. (Also published in Japanese.)

2. Moursund, D.G. (1969). How Computers Do It. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company. (Also published in Spanish.)

3. Moursund, D.G. (1970). Problem Analysis and Solution Using FORTRAN IV. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company.

4. Moursund, D.G. (ed.) (1973). Computers in Education Resource Handbook. Published by the Computer Science Department, University of Oregon. Revised editions were published in 1974, 1975, and 1976. Most of the content was written by Moursund's students.

5. Moursund, D.G. (ed.) (1976). Readings on Calculators and Computers in the Elementary School. Published by the Computer Science Department, University of Oregon. Written for use in Computer Science 407, 2 quarter hours of credit, correspondence course available through the Office of Independent Studies, 1633 S. W. Park Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97207.

6. Moursund, D.G. (1977). Calculators, Computers, and Elementary Education. Self-published and sold directly and through the Math Learning Center, Salem, Oregon.

7. Moursund, D.G. (1978). BASIC Programming for Computer Literacy. New York: McGraw-Hill.

8. Moursund, D.G., & Billings, K. (1979). Are You Computer Literate? Beaverton, OR: dilithium Press. (Also published in Spanish.)

9. Moursund, D.G., & Billings, K. (1979). Problem Solving with Calculators. Beaverton, OR: dilithium Press.

10. Moursund, D.G. (1981). Calculators in the Classroom: With Applications for Elementary and Middle School Teachers. New York: John Wiley & Sons. (Also published in Spanish.)

11. Moursund, D.G. (1981, 1983). Introduction to Computers in Education for Elementary and Middle School Teachers. Eugene, OR: International Council for Computers in Education.

12. Moursund, D.G. Co-author and Editor. (1983). Computer Literacy Activities for Elementary and Middle School Students. Eugene, OR: International Council for Computers in Education.

13. Moursund, D.G., & Ricketts, D. (1987, 1988) Long-Range Planning for Computers in Schools. Self-published, no longer available.

14. Moursund, D.G. (1988). Effective Inservice for Integrating Computer-as-Tool into the Curriculum. Eugene, OR: International Council for Computers in Education.

NOTE: David Moursund was project director for the NSF Computer Integrated Instruction Inservice Project, 1985-1989. The project produced four books that Moursund co-authored with the NSF project staff.

15. Moursund, D.G., & NSF project staff (1988). Computer-Integrated Instruction: Effective Inservice for Secondary School Mathematics Teachers. Eugene, OR: International Council for Computers in Education.

16. Moursund, D.G., & NSF project staff (1989). Computer-Integrated Instruction: Effective Inservice for Elementary School Teachers. Eugene, OR: International Council for Computers in Education.

17. Moursund, D.G., & NSF project staff (1990). Computer-Integrated Instruction: Effective Inservice for Secondary School Social Studies Teachers. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

18. Moursund, D.G., & NSF project staff (1990). Computer-Integrated Instruction: Effective Inservice for Secondary School Science Teachers. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

19. Moursund, D.G., & Yoder, S.K. (1990, 1992). LogoWriter and Problem Solving. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

20. Moursund, D.G., & Yoder, S.K. (1990). Logo PLUS and Problem Solving. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

21. Moursund, D.G., & Yoder, S.K. (1993). Introduction to ClarisWorks: A Tool for Personal Productivity. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

22. Moursund, D.G., & Yoder, S.K. (1994). Introduction to MicroWorlds—A Logo-Based Hypermedia Environment. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

23. Moursund, D.G., & Yoder, S.K. (1994). Yes, You Can Create Graphics! An Introduction to Roles of Computers in Problem Solving SuperPaint. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.

24. Moursund, D.G., & Smith, I. (1994, 1996). The Journey Inside: The Computer. 283-page Teacher's Edition. Intel Corporation. This book was distributed by Intel as part of a kit of electronic materials. Well over a hundred thousand of these kits were given away.

Some Thoughts About Book Writing

I started writing my first book in 1965. It is a math book, co-authored with a fellow faculty member when we were teaching at Michigan State University. The book was based on a Numerical Analysis course for engineers that we taught frequently.

Over the years, as I taught a course I often had a strong inclination to write a book that fit the content that I believed should be in the course. This was at a time when computers were becoming more and more available and relevant to education.

Eventually I fell into a pattern of writing a book about any aspect of education that I became interested in. I would learn about the topic from a non-computer point of view, add my computer-oriented insights, and product a "modern" book.

Eight of my early books were published by "traditional" commercial publishers. In 1979, I founded the International Council for Computers in Education (ICCE) and began writing books to support its activities. Thus, a large number of my books were published through ICCE. In 1989 ICCE changed its name to the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). My wife Sharon Yoder and I, individually and jointly, published a number of books through ISTE.

I retired from ISTE and from the University of Oregon in the early 2000s. I continued my interest in book writing, and I self-published my new books on the Web. Meanwhile, ISTE returned to me the copyright on all but one of the books I had published through ICCE and ISTE. My book on project-based learning was returned to me in 2016 and is now available free on the IAE websites.

For a brief 12/29/2011 personal note "About being a prolific writer" see http://i-a-e.org/iae-blog/entry/about-being-a-prolific-writer.html.

Author

This page was written by David Moursund.

About David Moursund

Moursund, D. (2016). David Moursund. IAE-pedia. Retrieved 8/25/2016 from http://iae-pedia.org/David_Moursund.

Moursund, D. (n.d.). David Moursund. IAE Blog. Retrieved 8/25/2016 from http://iae-pedia.org/David_Moursund.

Moursund, D. (n.d.). David Moursund. Wikipedia. Retrieved 8/25/2016 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Moursund.